Camille Hernández-Ramdwar

Photo of Camille Hernández-Ramdwar

Associate Professor Faculty of Arts Department of Sociology Toronto, Ontario chernand@ryerson.ca Office: (416) 979-5000 ext. 4193

Bio/Research

Dr. Hernández-Ramdwar is Team Lead on the Posting for Peace research project, part of the Rights of Children and Youth Partnership, funded by a SSHRC Partnership grant http://rcypartnership.org/en/. The project investigates the use of social media and ICTs by youth and children in 7 Central Ameri...

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Bio/Research

Dr. Hernández-Ramdwar is Team Lead on the Posting for Peace research project, part of the Rights of Children and Youth Partnership, funded by a SSHRC Partnership grant http://rcypartnership.org/en/. The project investigates the use of social media and ICTs by youth and children in 7 Central American and Caribbean countries, and how this relates to violence. She is the writer/director /producer of Posting for Peace, a short documentary on the pilot study which took place in Trinidad.

Additional research interests include Caribbean cultures and identities, Afro-Caribbean religions, diasporic and second generation identities, and racism and Caribbean peoples in Canada. She is the author of the ebook Introduction to the Caribbean: Diversity, Challenges, Resiliency, 2nd Edition (Kendall Hunt 2016). Her recent work appears in Caribbean Healing Traditions: Implications for Health and Mental Health, Routledge (2014), Journal of Heritage Tourism (2013), Searching for Equality: Inclusion and Equity in the Canadian Academy, University of Toronto Press (2009), Caribbean Review of Gender Studies (Fall 2008), and TOPIA (Fall 2008). Dr. Hernandez-Ramdwar is also a writer of short stories, narratives, and poetry dealing with the issues of diasporic, transnational, and multiracial identities. Her work has been published in anthologies such as Talking About Identity: Encounters in Race, Ethnicity and Language (James and Shadd, 2001), Beneath the Cotton Tree Root (Hopkinson, 2000), and "...but where are you really from?": Stories of Identity and Assimilation in Canada (Palmer, 1997).


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